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Front of House
Front Door
Entrance Hall
Sitting Room
Dining Room
Kitchen
Drawing Room
Pool Table
Walled Garden
Orchard & BBQ
Tree House & Swing
  • Front of House
  • Front Door
  • Entrance Hall
  • Sitting Room
  • Dining Room
  • Kitchen
  • Drawing Room
  • Pool Table
  • Walled Garden
  • Orchard & BBQ
  • Tree House & Swing


Accommodation

Seven double bedrooms in the main house with a further two in an optional annex...

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Activities

There are plenty of activities at Cross Tree House and the surrounding area...

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Gallery

Take a look around Cross Tree House...

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Introduction

Cross Tree House is a stunning 17th century thatched farmhouse in rural Somerset, full of character and charm. It sleeps between 14 and 22 guests in the main house and a further 4 in an optional annexe. Built of golden hamstone with flagstone floors, beamed ceilings, leaded light windows, solid oak furniture and original oil paintings, it is the quintessential English country home; The perfect venue for joint family holidays, group courses and activities, house parties and reunions. The house has full central heating in every room and all services and logs are included in the rental so there are no additional bills to be paid at the end of your stay.

History

Cross Tree House was originally a farmhouse on the Lord Poulett Estate. It takes its name from the market cross, the remains of which lie under the oak tree outside the house. As a young priest, Cardinal Wolsey was put in the stocks in front of the house for being drunk and disorderly at the village fair. John Adams, one of the early tenant farmers, was transported to Barbados for taking part in Monmouth's Rebellion in 1685. The house was leased by Earl Poulett to the Church until the end of the First World War when it passed into private hands. It was used during the Second War to house evacuees.

There is evidence of human habitation in this area dating back to the Stone Age (a stone age implement was found in the garden) and the Roman road running past the house connects directly to the Fosse Way.

A Roman Villa was recently discovered 100 yards from the house with well preserved mosaics and hypocaust.

www.lopenmosaic.com

A local tradition called Punkie Night is still alive today. It originated when the men of Lopen and Hinton St George got drunk at Chiselborough fair and failed to return home. The furious wives hollowed out lamps from mangel-wurzels and went in pursuit of their errant husbands. What ensued is veiled in the mists of time, but the children still carve scary lamps and parade through Hinton St George and Chiselborough on the last Thursday in October.

" The house is so cosy & comfortable & yet also large enough for a happy gathering of friends. We cannot wait to come back. "